COML0081 - Decolonizing French Food

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Decolonizing French Food
Term
2024C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML0081401
Course number integer
81
Meeting times
MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Elizabeth Collins
Description
Wine and cheese, baguettes and croissants, multiple courses and fresh ingredients straight from the market—these are the internationally recognized hallmarks of French food. Yet, even as the practices surrounding the mythical French table have been deemed worthy of a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage List since 2010, culinary traditions in France remain persistently rooted in legacies of colonialism that are invisible to many. In order to “decolonize” French food, this seminar turns to art, literature, and film, as well as archival documents such as advertisements, maps, and cookbooks. In what ways do writers and filmmakers use food to interrogate the human, environmental, and cultural toll that French colonialism has taken on the world? How do their references to food demonstrate the complex cultural creations, exchanges, and asymmetries that have arisen from legacies of colonialism?
We will interpret artworks, read literature (in English or in translation), and watch films (subtitled in English) that span the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by authors and directors from across the Francosphere—from Haiti, Guadeloupe, and Martinique in the Caribbean; to Mauritius in the Indian Ocean; from the Vietnamese diaspora in France, Canada, and the United States; to North, Central, and West Africa. Just as food can be examined from many angles, our discussions will focus on art, literature, and film, but also take into account perspectives from the fields of history, anthropology, and environmental studies. Moreover, we will employ the theoretical tools supplied by food studies, feminist and gender studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.
Course number only
0081
Cross listings
AFRC0081401, FREN0081401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML2007 - Dostoevsky

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
402
Title (text only)
Dostoevsky
Term
2024C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
402
Section ID
COML2007402
Course number integer
2007
Meeting times
MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Aleksey Berg
Description
This seminar is a survey of the life and works of Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881). Focal texts include a selection of his major novels and a range of shorter works that span Dostoevsky's early career, his return from exile in Siberia, and the last years of his life. We will work together to understand Dostoevsky's career and self-conception as a writer, the wide-ranging philosophical implications of his work, and how his activity can be interpreted in the historical, ideological, and literary contexts of nineteenth-century Russia and Europe.
Course number only
2007
Cross listings
REES0480402
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML5245 - Topics in Medieval Studies: Premodern Animals (c.500-c.1500)

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
940
Title (text only)
Topics in Medieval Studies: Premodern Animals (c.500-c.1500)
Term session
S
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
940
Section ID
COML5245940
Course number integer
5245
Level
graduate
Instructors
Emily R Steiner
Description
From St. Cuthbert, whose freezing feet were warmed by otters, to St. Guinefort, a miracle-performing greyhound in 13th-century France, to Melusine, the half-fish, half-woman ancestress of the house of Luxembourg (now the Starbucks logo), medieval narratives are deeply inventive in their portrayal of human-animal interactions. This course introduces students to critical animals studies via medieval literature and culture. We will read a range of genres, from philosophical commentaries on Aristotle and theological commentaries on Noah’s ark to werewolf poems, beast fables, political satires, saints’ lives, chivalric romances, bestiaries, natural encyclopaedias, dietary treatises and travel narratives.
Among the many topics we will explore are the following: animals in premodern law; comfort and companion animals; vegetarianism across religious cultures; animal symbolism and human virtue; taxonomies of species in relation to race, gender, and class; literary animals and political subversion; menageries and collecting across medieval Europe, the Near East, and Asia; medieval notions of hybridity, compositeness, trans-species identity, and interspecies relationships; art and the global traffic in animals (e.g., ivory, parchment); European encounters with New World animals; and the legacy of medieval animals in contemporary philosophy and media.
No prior knowledge of medieval literature is required. Students from all disciplines are welcome.
Course number only
5245
Cross listings
CLST7710940, ENGL5245940, RELS6101940
Use local description
No

COML1701 - Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML1701920
Course number integer
1701
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jordan Carrick
Description
What do the ancient Greek comedian Aristophanes, the Roman satirist Juvenal, have in common with rappers Snoop Dogg and Eminem? Many things, in fact, but perhaps most fundamental is their delight in shocking audiences and upending social norms. This course will examine the various arts (including literary, visual and musical media) that transgress the boundaries of taste and convention in ancient Greco-Roman culture and our own era. We will consider, among other topics, why communities feel compelled to repudiate some forms of scandalous art, while turning others - especially those that have come down to us from remote historical periods - into so-called classics.
Course number only
1701
Cross listings
CLST1701920
Fulfills
Humanties & Social Science Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

COML1191 - World Literature

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
921
Title (text only)
World Literature
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
921
Section ID
COML1191921
Course number integer
1191
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
How do we think 'the world' as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
Course number only
1191
Cross listings
CLST1602921, ENGL1179921
Use local description
No

COML1191 - World Literature

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
World Literature
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML1191920
Course number integer
1191
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Akhil Puthiyadath Veetil
Description
How do we think 'the world' as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
Course number only
1191
Cross listings
CLST1602920, ENGL1179920
Use local description
No

COML1022 - World Film History 1945-Present

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
World Film History 1945-Present
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML1022920
Course number integer
1022
Meeting times
TR 10:15 AM-1:49 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Humberto Morales Cruz
Description
Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation.
Course number only
1022
Cross listings
ARTH1090920, CIMS1020920, ENGL1901920
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML1011 - World Film History to 1945

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
World Film History to 1945
Term session
1
Term
2024B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
910
Section ID
COML1011910
Course number integer
1011
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Maria Dolores Gonzalez Ortega
Hugo Salas
Description
This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
Course number only
1011
Cross listings
ARTH1080910, CIMS1010910, ENGL1900910
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

Samantha Pious's début poetry collection, Sappho Is Dead, published by Headmistress Press.

Headmistress Press is proud to present the debut collection of Samantha Pious SAPPHO IS DEAD

This collection is about queer women’s literary tradition and experimentation—in other words, building a canon of our own.

Please see link:  (https://www.amazon.com/Sappho-Dead-Samantha-Pious/dp/B0D29SYTXB)