Veronique Charles and Nico Fonseca named 2021-22 Dean's Scholar

Veronique Charles, Ph.D. student in the Comparative Literature and Literary Theory Program, has been named  Dean's Scholar.  Each year the School of Arts and Sciences hosts the Stephen A. Levin Family Dean’s Forum to honor outstanding students for their academic performance and intellectual promise by designating them as Dean’s Scholars.

Congratulations, Veronique!

Congratulations go to Nico Fonseca, a senior Comparative Literature Major from Florida, who has also been selected as Dean's Scholar!  

Erin Manning and Brian Massumi | The Misplaced Concreteness of the Senses

The body’s sensing is inseparable from processes of abstraction that extend life into incorporeal realms. From sonsensuous similarity to amodal perception, from reaching-toward to preacceleration, from distantism to synaesthesia, from autistic perception to lived abstraction, sensation and perception exceed the model of sense impression inherited from classical empiricism.

COML981 - M.A. Exam Prep

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
M.A. Exam Prep
Term
2022A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
001
Section ID
COML981001
Course number integer
981
Registration notes
Permission Needed From Instructor
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
Emily Wilson
Description
Course open to first-year Comparative Literature graduate students in preparation for required M.A. exam taken in spring of first year.
Course number only
981
Use local description
No

COML790 - Rec Issues in Crit Theor: Psychoanalysis and Critical Race Theory

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Rec Issues in Crit Theor: Psychoanalysis and Critical Race Theory
Term
2022A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML790401
Course number integer
790
Registration notes
For PhD Students Only
Meeting times
W 10:15 AM-01:15 PM
Meeting location
BENN 224
Level
graduate
Instructors
David L Eng
Description
Recent years have witnessed the emergence of a growing body of scholarship on psychoanalysis and race in cultural studies and the clinical arena. However, there has been little research considering psychoanalysis in relation to critical race theory, a movement that grew out of the 1980s U.S. legal academy examining the ways in which law and liberalism produce racial subjectivity and subordination. This seminar analyzes the psychic and the legal in tandem. We will put classic writings from these two fields in conversation with one another by focusing on some overlapping themes: subject-object relations in histories of slavery and property law; psychic and legal prohibitions on incest and miscegenation; legalized exclusion and state-sponsored segregation in regard to racial grief and grievance; the politics of colorblindness and mechanisms of repression and dissociation; transitional space and its connections to transitional justice and transitional democracy; reparations as a key concept in both political theory and object relations. Throughout the semester we will consider how the unconscious provides a critical framework for analyzing the intergenerational transmission of both trauma and structural racism.


Course number only
790
Cross listings
GSWS790401, ENGL790401
Use local description
Yes

COML767 - 1922: Long, Forgotten, Untimely

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
1922: Long, Forgotten, Untimely
Term
2022A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML767401
Course number integer
767
Meeting times
W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM
Meeting location
VANP 625
Level
graduate
Instructors
Paul K Saint-Amour
Description
1922 is widely regarded as the annus mirabilis or “wonder year” of international modernism, the year in which landmark works including T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, James Joyce’s Uysses, D. H. Lawrence’s Aaron’s Rod, Katherine Mansfield’s The Garden Party and Other Stories, Marcel Proust’s Sodom et Gomorrhe, and Virginia Woolf’s Jacob’s Room were published. In this seminar we’ll mark the centenary of 1922 by studying some of these works in whole or in part. But we’ll also use the occasion to examine the construction and ramifications of this particular wonder year, to shine a critical sidelight on the politics and temporality of punctual commemoration, and to explore pedagogical and methodological alternatives. Some questions we’ll pursue: what forgotten or under-consecrated works published in the same year, including works by non-white, non-Western, and non-settler authors, might complicate and perhaps decolonize narratives about it as an apogee of modernism? What are the limitations and affordances of constraining oneself to the archive of a year? What longer energies and period arcs ran through this particular year? In what ways could we say that 1922—that any year—refuses to correspond to itself or hold still under scrutiny?


Course number only
767
Cross listings
ENGL773401
Use local description
Yes

COML610 - Ancient Medieval Soul

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Ancient Medieval Soul
Term
2022A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML610401
Course number integer
610
Registration notes
For Doctoral Students Only
Meeting times
M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM
Meeting location
JAFF 104
Level
graduate
Instructors
Rita Copeland
Ralph Rosen
Description
This seminar focuses on premodern conceptions of the 'soul', the force felt to animate and energize a human body for as long as it was considered alive, and to activate virtually all aspects of its behavior through time. Premodern concepts of the soul attempted to account for a person's emotions and desires, perceptions, thoughts, memory, intellect, moral behavior, and sometimes physical condition. The course will trace the various ancient theories of the soul from the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoic thought in Greek and Latin, medical writers (Hippocratics, Hellenistic doctors, Galen), and Neoplatonists, to the medieval receptions and transformations of ancient thought, including Augustine and Boethius, Avicenna's interpretation of Aristotle and its medieval influence, and Aquinas and other later medieval ethicists. These premodern conceptions of the soul have a surprisingly long afterlife, reaching into the literary cultures and psychological movements of early modernity and beyond. Knowledge of Greek or Latin not required, but see the following: The seminar will meet for one two-hour session per week, and a separate one-hour 'breakout' session during which students who have registered for GREK 608 will meet to study a selection texts in Greek, and students who have registered for COML/ENGL will meet to discuss medieval or early modern texts relevant to their fields of study.
Course number only
610
Cross listings
GREK608401, ENGL706401
Use local description
No